READ revolutionizes access to handwritten documents

From the Middle Ages to today, from old Greek to modern English, from running text to tables or forms

About

READ's mission is to revolutionize access to archival documents with the support of cutting-edge technology such as Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) and Keyword Spotting (KWS).

Learn more

Network

READ addresses archives and libraries, humanities scholars, family historians, volunteers - and computer scientists

Learn more

Research

Research in READ comprises exciting fields such as Artificial Intelligence, Pattern Recognition, Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing.

Learn more

Services

READ technology is available via the service platform Transkribus. Upload documents, train a Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) model, process text and follow the progress of the project.

Learn more

Recent Posts

+ Searching more than 100 years of mountaineering history with Transkribus

We are proud to be part of a successful project carried out by the New Zealand Alpine Club and the University of Innsbruck (Linguistic Institute). The complete workflow was done within Transkribus: apart from uploading files and running the text recognition volunteers used the web-based transcription interface from Transkribus to carefully correct all 17,500 pages of the New Zealand Alpine Journal.

In order to make the journal also searchable, Transkribus team members developed a simple but effective web-application, which enables users to browse all issues and to search the full-text of the complete journal. The application runs also very well on a smartphone. All data is hosted by Transkribus.

The project received its funding via the crowd-funding-platform Give a little. People donated about 6 000 NZD, which is a great support.

Check out the web-application for searching the journal editions here.

 

Foto credit: https://www.nzaj-archive.nz/

+ Crowdsourcing with Transkribus at Amsterdam City Archives

When we work together, there’s so much we can achieve! Amsterdam City Archives and VeleHanden have just launched a fantastic crowdsourcing initiative which combines the power of our Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) technology with the talents of volunteer transcribers.

Image credit: Amsterdam City Archives

Amsterdam City Archives are interested in opening up access to the records of Amsterdam’s notaries, which span from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. These documents are ripe for further exploration for those interested in the rich social and economic history of the Dutch capital.  The ultimate aim is to create a fully searchable record of this precious handwritten collection.

The team have been working with our Transkribus platform to train HTR models to recognise different parts of this collection.

The HTR models were used to generate automated transcripts of the documents. It is now up to volunteers to correct any errors made by the machine!

The project is hosted on VeleHanden, a successful crowdsourcing platform created by the company PicturaeCrowd leert computer lezen is directly connected to the Transkribus web interface, meaning that any changes made by volunteers can be fed straight back into the system to improve the automated recognition.

Anyone can take part in this new project and explore various difficulty levels to find documents they are interested in.  Volunteers collect points for their transcription work which can be redeemed at exhibitions and events at Amsterdam City Archives.

We are really looking forward to seeing what the computer can learn from the crowd…

Mark Ponte from Amsterdam City Archives gave us a sneak peak of the project at our recent Transkribus User Conference

CORNELIS STAAL 1749-1753 – 1 – Beginner – 13131 – A31239000579. Screenshot from Crowd leert computer lezen. Image credit: Amsterdam City Archives.