READ revolutionizes access to handwritten documents

From the Middle Ages to today, from old Greek to modern English, from running text to tables or forms

About

READ's mission is to revolutionize access to archival documents with the support of cutting-edge technology such as Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) and Keyword Spotting (KWS).

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Network

READ addresses archives and libraries, humanities scholars, family historians, volunteers - and computer scientists

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Research

Research in READ comprises exciting fields such as Artificial Intelligence, Pattern Recognition, Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing.

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Services

READ technology is available via the service platform Transkribus. Upload documents, train a Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) model, process text and follow the progress of the project.

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Recent Posts

+ Document Engineering, Cultural Heritage, and Digital Humanities – READ at the DocEng2016 symposium

This year’s DocEng symposium was organised by one of the READ partners, the Computer Vision Lab at Vienna University of Technology.  Between 13 and 16 September academic and industrial researchers were welcomed to Vienna where they had the opportunity to hear about the latest research on document engineering and participate in workshops on topics such as Table Modelling and Future Publishing Formats.

One of the keynote lectures was delivered by Dr Günter Mühlberger, the projector coordinator of READ.  Dr Mühlberger’s talk was entitled, ‘Research Infrastructures, or how Document Engineering, Cultural Heritage, and Digital Humanities can go together’.  Dr Mühlberger wrote his PhD thesis on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and has always been interested in integrating digital technologies into the humanities.  His paper described the Transkribus research infrastructure which is being developed by the READ project.  The talk showed an audience of specialised computer scientists that the technologies of Handwritten Text Recognition, Automatic Writer Identification and Keyword Spotting are hugely relevant to the humanities sector because they can improve access to historical records.

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Dr Günter Mühlberger at DocEng 2016

+ Demystifying Digitisation – Registration now open

Demystifying Digitisation: A Hands-On Master Class in Text Digitisation will take place at the University of Antwerp from 29 to 30 September 2016.  Registration is now open for those wanting to learn more about Transkribus and digitisation projects in general.

Organised by the Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities-Belgium (DARIAH-BE) and Digital Humanities Flanders (DHuF), the programme will include two intensive workshops – the first on ABBYY OCR software, the second on the Transkribus platform for handwritten text recognition.  There will also be related sessions on digitisation workflows, copyright issues and more.

Participation in the workshop is free of charge but registration is required.